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this is the first of an ongoing article series by award-winning translator and poet Marne Kilates.

while Filipino is not strictly Tagalog, it is still based in Tagalog, therefore i'm sure we in the community have a lot to learn from this.

The media—broadcast or print—are the biggest, most widespread and readily recognizable “users” of language while the masses—here used to mean everyone—are obviously the greatest “consumers” of language. Anything erroneously said or heard in media is multiplied several times over precisely because of its massive, nationwide reach.

As used in the media, there should be a distinction, for example, between the words kagampan, or a woman’s full-term pregnancy, and kaganapan, fulfillment. But worse, many of our speakers in media mistakenly use kaganapan for events, proceedings or incidents, which are, simply, pangyayari.

Another case is that our radio and TV broadcasts are swimming in kung saan, which to many ears is the audio equivalent of the foul-smelling debris coming out of the clogged esteros every time it rains. If we may give an example of the correct usage of the phrase, here’s one: “Hindi natin alam kung saang lupalop pinulot ng ating broadcasters ang kakatuwa nilang gamit ng kung saan.”


read more here: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/450495/confused-use-of-filipino-in-media-perpetuates-errors

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